Landing Page Tips for Ecommerce: Part 2

In our previous blog post, we went over tips for improving the content and functionality on ecommerce landing pages to make them better at engaging users and driving conversions. In this post, we'll present a few guidelines for page layout and design you can use to make your landing pages more visually appealing and memorable.
    

Balance visual appeal with practicality

Some ecommerce professionals consider the “design” of a landing page as whatever makes it pretty or eye-catching. As such, the layout of design elements becomes one of the last considerations when creating the page. However, this lack of planning can hinder customers from quickly finding important information or navigation elements – making them more likely to bounce. Don't overload users with information upfront. Imagine the page from your customers' point of view, and ask yourself: What do they want or need to know first? What info is vital to convince them to take action?

Break up content to make it more digestible

Keep the text short and actionable for users by formatting your content so that it is easy to scan (especially for mobile users). You can accomplish this by using bulleted lists, separating blocks of text into sections with sub- headlines, and providing detailed information through accordion-style navigation or separate pages.

Leverage color psychology

When making your landing page, don’t just think about what looks good – consider how the colors will work together to resonate with the audience and use this to your advantage. For example, red is known to create a sense of urgency while purple is usually synonymous with luxury or royalty. Consider what color combinations match the tone of the page and use them to subtly reinforce your messaging. Once again, A/B testing is a useful way for finding the options that work best.

Landing Page Tips for Ecommerce: Part 1

A landing page is a web page created specifically for convincing visitors to act (i.e. to sign up, buy, download, etc.). Like the sales displays or helpful associates at a brick-and-mortar shop, your ecommerce site's landing pages can be a deciding factor in getting shoppers to complete a purchase, or dive deeper into your site for more information or other products. To help make your landing pages as successful as they can be, we've assembled the following tips into a 2-part guide. In this post, we'll cover some important considerations for content and functionality that can make most types of ecommerce landing pages more effective.

Clear paths & CTAs

Landing pages serve as informational gateways about your products and brand - they are rarely the last step in a buyer's journey. Whether your goal is to get visitors to "buy now," "contact us," or "learn more," the content and navigation on your landing pages should make it as easy as possible for customers to take the next step. To figure out the optimal placement of these elements, use A/B testing to find a configuration that works best.

Go beyond plain text

Plain text may clearly communicate everything you want it to, but not every user responds to that. A landing page that uses a variety of content types – especially video – can increase information retention and conversion rates. Create video demonstrations of your products, or other types of visual content, to grab users' attention and quickly communicate key information about your product offerings and/or CTAs.  

Simplified lead-gen forms

If your landing page is geared toward getting users to "sign up" or submit info, you need to make it as quick and easy as possible for them to complete this process. Keep the required fields to a minimum and only request the information you truly need – you can always follow up for more detailed information later via “complete your profile” emails or pop-up prompts. As a rule: make it possible for customers to complete actions in a few steps as possible.

Next week, we'll supplement the above info with layout and design tips for making landing pages that are more appealing and engaging.

Color Psychology for Branding & Merchandizing

The science and psychology behind colors is important to consider when measuring the effectiveness of your customer-facing collateral. The colors used for your web pages, advertisements, and exclusive products impact the way current and potential customers perceive your brand. You want to be sure that the color schemes you use resonate with your brand messaging while also evoking the right kind of emotional response from your audience. Whether you're adding a new line of products to your ecommerce site or thinking of re-branding, it's worthwhile to consider how color psychology can work for you. In this post, we'll explain the common psychological associations (from a U.S. cultural perspective) for a spectrum of colors that are useful to retailers and e-tailers alike.

Red    
Associated with: Hunger, Urgency, Danger, Love, Heat
Red is an effective color when placed on call-to-action buttons or ads to grab users’ attention and inspire them to take action.
    
Black
Associated with: Power, Formality, Mystery, Elegance, Expensive, Gravitas
Black is often seen as a color of sophistication and authority, but can come off as intimidating if overused. When used sparingly, black has a grounding effect and pairs well with a spectrum of other shades.

Brown
Associated with: Historical, Traditional, Rustic, Earthen, Classical
Brown shades are very effective when promoting products that have “rugged” qualities, or appealing to audiences with more austere or conservative sensibilities.

Violet
Associated with: Luxury, Magical, Imaginative, Majestic, Passion
Consider the use of violet or purple when unveiling a new or innovative product, as the color invites shoppers into an imaginative experience.

Green
Associated with: Progress, Health, Money, Freshness, Growth, Environmentalism
Most commonly found in the promotion of healthy or environmentally conscious products or services, green can also be used to evoke the concepts of wealth and bountiful prosperity.

Orange
Associated with: Creativity, Expressive, Warm, Exciting, Energetic
Orange is known as the color that “pops.” Consider using for calls-to-action or to highlight product features you would like to bring attention to.

Blue
Associated with: Trust, Calmness, Professional, Reliable, Cool, Peaceful
The color blue puts people at ease. This color works well for promoting customer services or authoritative information.

White
Associated with: Cleanliness, Simplicity, Easy, Purity
White is often used to evoke efficiency, but can come off as cold and sterile if overused. White works best when combined with other colors to soften their impact and add clarity to designs that may otherwise come off as too busy or bright.  

Localization & Ecommerce: Tips for Expanding into New Regions

More and more companies are trying to change up their merchandizing strategies in preparation for entering new global markets. Beyond translating marketing content correctly into various languages, e-tailers also need to reevaluate information like item specifications and sizing details to align with regional norms and local consumer protection laws. Social standards as well as neighborhood laws are also critical factors to think about with development into new markets. To help ensure that your website and product information is comprehensive, relevant and accessible to foreign audiences, follow these guidelines.

Make updates to product specifications and descriptions

When expanding your reach to global customers, it's critical to localize product information across webpages and promotional content. This includes revamping SKU info with market-appropriate specifications (e.g. converting imperial measurements to metric) and descriptions that properly translate into your target audiences language(s) and/or dialect(s).

Research cultural norms and make changes accordingly

Ecommerce sites that sell to different regions need to consider numerous cultural aspects, such as seasonal trends, societal norms, and holidays. For example, the color purple is associated with aristocracy, royalty, and riches in many parts of the world. However, in Brazil and Thailand, purple is associated with somber occasions and periods of mourning. Your product offerings and item descriptions may need to be customized according to these kinds of nuances.

Guarantee Quality Control and Legal Compliance

Policies concerning labeling, licensing, and merchandising all vary between countries. For example, many regions have different labeling formats and information requirements for ingredients, country of origin, and health warnings. Sellers (especially those with large item catalogs) may require sophisticated product information management systems to assist them with making and tracking changes for regulatory compliance quickly across numerous markets.

Data Security Guidelines for Ecommerce

While it feels like stories about corporate data breaches are more common than ever nowadays, it’s definitely not a bandwagon you’d want to join. In addition to losing the trust of your customers, there can be substantial costs related to a data breach in the form of security upgrades, legal fees, and more. To help keep your ecommerce company from joining the growing list of hacked businesses, use the following guidelines to tighten up your website security and protect consumer data.

Identify region-specific compliance requirements

Some states and countries have requirements regarding how companies use, save, and store consumer data. It's vital that you know where your business is being conducted and that whether there are regional data security laws that apply to you. Failing to comply with regulations, such as the Securities for Consumer Data Personal Privacy Act in Colorado or the Golden State Consumer Personal Privacy Act of 2018 in California, not only indicates that your company’s data may be vulnerable – you may also be at risk of incurring significant fines or penalties.

Perform a data security risk assessment

Hire a third-party to run a risk analysis on your current data security architecture to identify any vulnerabilities. Then, outline a strategy for prioritizing and patching those vulnerabilities. Remember: hackers commonly look for easy targets and will move on from targets that require more effort to exploit.

Train and educate your employees

One of the biggest vulnerabilities in any kind of data security strategy are the employees. Make certain your data is safe from unintentional employee mistakes through adequate training and by establishing clear protocols for managing data.