Localization & Ecommerce: Tips for Expanding into New Regions

More and more companies are trying to change up their merchandizing strategies in preparation for entering new global markets. Beyond translating marketing content correctly into various languages, e-tailers also need to reevaluate information like item specifications and sizing details to align with regional norms and local consumer protection laws. Social standards as well as neighborhood laws are also critical factors to think about with development into new markets. To help ensure that your website and product information is comprehensive, relevant and accessible to foreign audiences, follow these guidelines.

Make updates to product specifications and descriptions

When expanding your reach to global customers, it's critical to localize product information across webpages and promotional content. This includes revamping SKU info with market-appropriate specifications (e.g. converting imperial measurements to metric) and descriptions that properly translate into your target audiences language(s) and/or dialect(s).

Research cultural norms and make changes accordingly

Ecommerce sites that sell to different regions need to consider numerous cultural aspects, such as seasonal trends, societal norms, and holidays. For example, the color purple is associated with aristocracy, royalty, and riches in many parts of the world. However, in Brazil and Thailand, purple is associated with somber occasions and periods of mourning. Your product offerings and item descriptions may need to be customized according to these kinds of nuances.

Guarantee Quality Control and Legal Compliance

Policies concerning labeling, licensing, and merchandising all vary between countries. For example, many regions have different labeling formats and information requirements for ingredients, country of origin, and health warnings. Sellers (especially those with large item catalogs) may require sophisticated product information management systems to assist them with making and tracking changes for regulatory compliance quickly across numerous markets.

Data Security Guidelines for Ecommerce

While it feels like stories about corporate data breaches are more common than ever nowadays, it’s definitely not a bandwagon you’d want to join. In addition to losing the trust of your customers, there can be substantial costs related to a data breach in the form of security upgrades, legal fees, and more. To help keep your ecommerce company from joining the growing list of hacked businesses, use the following guidelines to tighten up your website security and protect consumer data.

Identify region-specific compliance requirements

Some states and countries have requirements regarding how companies use, save, and store consumer data. It's vital that you know where your business is being conducted and that whether there are regional data security laws that apply to you. Failing to comply with regulations, such as the Securities for Consumer Data Personal Privacy Act in Colorado or the Golden State Consumer Personal Privacy Act of 2018 in California, not only indicates that your company’s data may be vulnerable – you may also be at risk of incurring significant fines or penalties.

Perform a data security risk assessment

Hire a third-party to run a risk analysis on your current data security architecture to identify any vulnerabilities. Then, outline a strategy for prioritizing and patching those vulnerabilities. Remember: hackers commonly look for easy targets and will move on from targets that require more effort to exploit.

Train and educate your employees

One of the biggest vulnerabilities in any kind of data security strategy are the employees. Make certain your data is safe from unintentional employee mistakes through adequate training and by establishing clear protocols for managing data.

How to Evaluate 3PL Performance

So, you've decided to partner with a third-party logistics provider. Compared to trying to juggle 100% of fulfillment duties in-house, you've most likely seen several KPI improvements since contracting outside help. However, do you have a methodology in place to more objectively evaluate your 3PL's performance – and make a case for either renewing that partnership or seeking out a new one? Although every ecommerce business has different goals and priorities, you can use these broad considerations to help determine whether the terms of your current 3PL partnership should be reevaluated:

Size

If your company has grown significantly, it may have reached the point where in-house fulfillment management is finally viable. Or perhaps you may find that your current provider lacks the flexible space and staffing required to handle fluctuations in sales volume or product offerings.

Capabilities

For many e-tailers, fulfillment has become quite complex. You might decide to seek out a new 3PL in order to access strategically located distribution centers, better warehouse technology, or new customization capabilities to improve your fulfillment operations.

Costs

If warehouse space, labor, and/or shipping costs are having a disproportionate impact on your bottom line, it may be time to find a 3PL that can reduce your overhead in some or all of these areas.

Customer satisfaction

Ensuring a positive experience for the customer should be your 3PL’s top priority. Inventory issues, inaccurate orders, and delivery delays are signals that you need a 3PL that does a better job of adhering to your expectations for customer service.

Checkout Changes that can help Lower Abandonment Rates

When it comes to customer acquisition in ecommerce, checkout pages are the great equalizer. No matter how incredible your products are – if your checkout process isn't as fast and convenient as it possibly could be, your cart abandonment rates will be unnecessarily high. It’s a pervasive issue that even big sites have to deal with. Fortunately, any changes you can make to bolster your checkout's functionality (even small ones) will pay dividends over the long term. In this post, we'll cover some of the most effective changes you can make to your checkout pages to reduce cart abandonment.

Clarity

Cluttering your checkout with multiple pop-ups, pages, and hyperlinks distracts customers from actually completing the process. While its fine to have pages on your site with more than one call-to-action, the checkout should only focus on checking out. If possible, condense the checkout into a single page that is structured to clearly guide shoppers through the process of finalizing their order. Save other CTAs for the "Thank You" page instead. If your checkout process must be more than one page, adding a simple progress indicator to the top of each page can proactively address a customer’s frustrations with a longer or more complex checkout.

Cost transparency

Many ecommerce sites notice an increase in abandonment rates among customers who start the checkout process and see the cost of their order change – especially if it has increased because of shipping, taxes, and other necessary charges. To keep these "surprise" fees from eroding the trust of would-be customers, include an estimate of the total/final cost as early as possible in the checkout process.

Convenient payment options

Collecting payment info is usually the most tedious part of the checkout process – especially for mobile users who are likely trying to tap in 16 digits with only one thumb. Alternative payment options like Google Wallet, PayPal, and Apple Pay are designed to securely store users’ information and drastically speed up the checkout process by autofilling all the necessary payment fields. Additionally, the more payment options you can accept, the more customers you can serve.

Top Opportunities for Growth & Improvement in Ecommerce

To stay competitive in ecommerce, you should always be searching for opportunities to improve your website and the experience it offers your customers. Over the course of helping several clients bolster their ecommerce businesses this year, we noticed a few common tactics that were effective at improving sites in a variety of areas:

Product pages

Your product pages should provide shoppers with as much detail as possible so customers can comfortably "add to cart" without needing to leave your site to do additional research... and potentially find the information through a competitor. Think about ways you can enhance manufacturer-provided content to make it more robust and preemptively answer customer questions.

Customer experience

Call monitoring tools (if your customer service department uses them) can be a great resource for pinpointing areas of the customer experience that need improvement. Reviewing customer service calls can reveal patterns or errors you may not find otherwise, such as missing information (see above), frequently asked questions, or areas where CSRs need more training.

Cart & checkout

Upgrading the functionality of your site's cart and checkout process can be the most effective tactic for turning abandoned carts into completed purchases. Of all the strategies for improving ecommerce performance, this may be the one that most e-tailers struggle with. It's also perhaps the subject we've covered the most extensively on our blog. Click here to browse our collection of ideas for making better checkout pages.