Tactics for Reducing your Shipping Costs

The cost of shipping is one of the biggest competitive differentiators in ecommerce. Customers will readily abandon a cart or buy from a competitor if it means they will save money on shipping. But if you want to reduce shipping charges for your customers without taking a hit to the profit margins of every order, you need to examine your shipping pipeline for ways to improve efficiency and/or eliminate unnecessary expenses. Fortunately, there are many strategies you can consider, such as:

Negotiate with your carriers

The best step you can take toward reducing your shipping costs over the long-term is to negotiate with your shipping or 3PL providers. Review your previous shipping bills to find the major cost driving factors, and research the prices from competitors to get a better understanding of average shipping costs. At Fulfillment Works, we pass 100% of our shipping discounts on to our clients, which allows them to give better shipping rates to their customers.

Customized packaging

You can drive down your packaging costs by eliminating unnecessary dimensional space and excess dunnage. Examine your typical order sizes and order packaging assortments that suit them. Depending on your needs, custom packaging and kitting may be the best solution.
    

Remember to collect shipping refunds

Many shipping companies offer on-time shipping assurance as standard. As part of this benefit, you may be entitled to refunds on any deliveries that are delayed. If this kind of assurance is included in the agreement you have with your carrier, don’t forget to periodically review your shipping records and claim your refunds.

The Best Information to Include on Product Pages

The main function of product pages are to provide users with the information they need to decide whether to purchase a product. There are many types of information you can add to these pages to make them more useful to potential customers, including:
    

Imagery & Video

Give shoppers something more than standard manufacturer-provided photos – which tend to convey only basic information about a product. In addition to using images that show customers as many models, colors, angles, and other variables as possible, include images or videos of the product in multiple scenarios (e.g. in use, before assembly, in storage, on display, etc.) to give customers more information.

Product Descriptions

Written descriptions educate shoppers about the product's functions and features, specifications, and advantages over similar products. However, you don’t want to frustrate your users with a wall of text - so keep your product descriptions short and to the point. When possible, try to let your images do the talking.

User Reviews

Whether positive or negative, reviews are an asset for product pages. Obviously, positive reviews reinforce a prospective customer’s decision to buy. Meanwhile, negative reviews give you the opportunity to help consumers who were unhappy with a purchase. Even if they do not respond or change their review, other readers will see that you made an effort and are sincere in your customer service.

Technical Data

For certain types of products (especially in the B2B space), users really appreciate technical product data like dimensions, weight, materials, instructions, and spec drawings.

Shoppers rely on various types of product information in their purchasing decisions. Your product pages should provide this information with as much clarity and detail as possible so customers can comfortably "add to cart" without needing to leave your site and find the information elsewhere – possibly from a competitor.

Site Features to Boost Customer Spending

Using design choices to limit the checkout friction on your ecommerce site is a great strategy to increase customer spending. You can enhance a solid design with features that further add to the convenience of customers - encouraging them to order more.  In this post, we'll highlight what some of these features are and why they work.
    

Stock Alerts    

Adding “low stock” alerts to product pages creates a sense of urgency that prompts customers to purchase while the item is still available. If you link this feature with your inventory management system, you can even display the alert as a countdown.

Suggested Products

Product suggestions are a way to show customers items they may not have found on their own. However, showing other products based on category alone (the default functionality of many product suggestion widgets) is not very effective. Instead, use algorithms to make suggestions based on customer preferences (demonstrated by their overall order history), or on purchasing trends you notice (e.g. items based on seasonality or products that are commonly purchased together).

One-Click Buying

The checkout process is the area where most ecommerce customers abandon a purchase. If customers can skip the traditional checkout process, they’re that much more likely to place an order. There is a caveat in that one-click functionality is patented by Amazon and requires a licensing fee to use. Although it’s a useful feature to have on your site, it may not be worthwhile if you can’t recoup the cost of the license from the extra sales.

Strategies for Success in Inventory Management

Accurate tracking, measuring, and forecasting of inventory is crucial for seamless order fulfillment, financial decision-making, customer satisfaction, brand perception, and other aspects that drive the success of an ecommerce company. That is why even if your sales are through the roof, your success will be short-lived without capable inventory management. These guiding principles can help ensure that your inventory management stays successful and contributes to the growth of your business.
    

Data Clarity

Inventory data is an important consideration when making logistical, purchasing, and fulfillment decisions. Inaccurate or unclear data negatively impacts these areas - so it's critical to have inventory data that is clear, accessible, and up-to-date (ideally, in real-time).

Velocity Tracking

Inventory velocity is the time it takes to sell each individual item in stock. When you need to predict when inventory will need to be replenished, or decide if a product line should be liquidated, inventory velocity is a useful metric to have. It may not be tracked by your inventory management system, but it's something you should keep an eye on.

Keep Pace

Compare your inventory management metrics with industry benchmarks on a regular basis. If your inventory performance falls behind industry averages, it’s time to reevaluate your approach to inventory management and create a plan for improvement. Outside perspective can prove invaluable in such a situation; by collaborating with the right 3PL provider, you can get the expertise required to fix issues, and even improve growth and stability.

Assessing your Ecommerce Customer Service

Returning customers provide the best ROI for ecommerce companies. While there are lots of things you can do to retain customers, it’s important to remember the primary factor that influences whether a customer will continue to order from you: do you provide a good customer experience? To answer this question and make any necessary improvements, you have multiple options for assessing customer experience.
    
One excellent method is to become your own customer. Contact your company for help with placing an order. Buy something from yourself and evaluate your checkout process. After the order arrives, call customer service to troubleshoot some issues. Go through your returns process. Evaluate what you see from this perspective and ask yourself which areas have the highest need for change.

You can also assess your customer experience by looking at collected feedback. To start, you can analyze the latest product return codes to look for common themes (or, you can decide to implement new codes to get more granular data). If your customer service department uses call monitoring and/or complaint logging/reporting, that’s also an excellent way to find areas of the customer experience that need improvement. Finally, you can always ask your customers for constructive feedback with survey tools.

Don't forget: your competition's offerings and customer expectations are always evolving. Since it's a major competitive differentiator, it's critical to periodically assess your customer experience and make improvements where necessary.