USPS Rates for 2019 are now in Effect

Following in the footsteps of last year's rate increases from UPS and FedEx, the USPS enacted several rate increases of its own on January 27 this year. To help you estimate the impact on your business, we've outlined some of the key changes below:

Priority Mail Rates

Across the board, Priority Mail services increased by an average of 5.9%. Other changes of note include the elimination of balloon pricing for parcels shipping to Zones 1-4, and an average 3.9% increase for Priority Mail Express rates.

First Class Package Services

For the first time, First Class Package service rates will now be calculated based on Zone, similar to Priority Mail. Rates for this service will also increase by an average of 11.9%. First Class International rates will increase by an average of 3.9%.

Commercial Plus Flat Rates, and other services

Prices for Commercial Plus Flat Rate boxes and envelopes increased by an average of about 7% (but, if you disregard the very small 2% increase for Medium Flat Rate Boxes, all other flat rate containers actually increased by an average of 10%). In addition, Parcel Select Ground rates decreased by an average of 1.3%, while Media Mail rates increased by an average of 2.9%.

Changes to DIM weight pricing: Coming Soon

Originally slated to go into effect January 27, the USPS delayed the reduction in its dimensional weight divisor (DWD) from 194 to 166 until June 23 to provide shippers with more time to prepare. A package's DIM weight is calculated by dividing the cubic inches of the package by the DWD. The shipping rate for the package is calculated using whichever is greater - the package's actual weight, or its DIM weight. So, a lower DWD means that the DIM weight for all packages increases, making them more likely to incur a higher rate. However, that's not as bad as it sounds when you consider that both FedEx and UPS have been using a DWD of 166 since 2015.

It’s worth noting that although the USPS is raising many of its rates, it’s still an affordable option for lightweight packages traveling to residential destinations. Plus, the USPS doesn't add surcharges for things like fuel, regular Saturday delivery, or holiday “peak” season delivery – so it's still a valuable part of any shipper’s distribution mix. For a detailed review of all of USPS' prices changes, visit their website.

A Recap of UPS Rate Changes for 2019

UPS announced changes to its rates for 2019 in December last year – giving customers a mere 3 weeks before they went into effect. With the holidays in full swing, the entire fulfillment industry was extremely busy at that time – so if you missed the announcement or didn't have time to process the details, you’re not alone. To help get you up to speed, we’ve highlighted the some of the most important changes in the list below. For full details and pricing information, visit UPS to read the official announcement.

  • The rates for UPS® Ground, UPS Air and International services will increase an average + 4.9% (which follows the precedent set by FedEx's previously announced rate increases for 2019)
  • The index for determining the Domestic Air Fuel surcharge increased +0.25% for all thresholds. In addition, fuel surcharges will apply to accessorials such as Additional Handling, Over Maximum Limits, Signature Required and Adult Signature Required.
  • A new processing fee (+$2.00 per package) will be charged when Package Level Detail (PLD) is not provided to UPS prior to delivery.
  • The Additional Handling charge for all packages will increase by $2.25. Any U.S. domestic package exceeding 70 pounds in actual weight (i.e. not DIM weight) will incur an Additional Handling charge of $4.00.
  • The Address Correction charge will increase +$0.50, and the per shipment maximum will increase +$3.50.
  • The Large Package Surcharge will increase +$15.00 for U.S. Domestic commercial packages, +$25.00 for U.S. Domestic residential packages, +$15.00 for International packages.

Check out these Statistics on Warehouse Technology

Emerging technologies are a hot topic in the world of distribution and fulfillment operations. From advancements in mechatronic picking to new types of cloud-based WMS software, it's easy to come away from an industry conference feeling awestruck at what the future might hold. However, the recent DC Measures Study from the Warehousing Education and Research Council (WERC) indicates that the actual adoption and integration of these technologies is slow, with little signs of popularizing any time soon.
    
According to WERC's survey of 549 industry professionals, more than two-thirds of warehouse managers said people (not technologies) are the most important assets in their operations. Reflective of that, 35% of the fulfillment centers surveyed said they currently do not use a warehouse management system (WMS) – instead relying on "manual means such as Excel and disparate modules" to handle typical WMS functions. When asked about technologies they expected to implement over the next 10 years, more than 25% of those surveyed said they were “not likely to incorporate” sensors (e.g. RFID) or robotics/automation equipment. More than 50% said they were not likely to incorporate 3D printing, blockchain, drones, or driverless vehicles.

So, what types of technology are warehouses using? According to WERC’s survey,

  • 25.8% have installed voice-directed picking (up from 5.7% in 2008)
  • 18.3% use radio frequency identification (RFID)
  • 12% use pick-to-light
  • 11.1% have installed automated storage and retrieval systems (AS/RS)
  • 75% use some type of barcode and RF scanning system
  • 42.7% plan to implement “some form of real-time data and analytics” in the next 1-2 years (it’s worth noting that certain types of WMS, like the one we offer, have these features built-in)
  • 33% plan to implement mobile technology within 1-2 years
  • 26.6% plan to implement Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology within 1-2 years

While warehouses’ adoption rate of technology has certainly not been fast, it may not be as slow as this report indicates. After all, technology that is growing, like WMS solutions and IoT technology, are prerequisites to successfully deploying more advanced systems like robotics and automation equipment. Perhaps this is a case of “learning to walk before you run.”

Should you open more Distribution Centers?

Expanding your ecommerce business by opening more distribution centers (DCs) can be a beneficial strategy for reducing shipping costs and delivery times. However, more isn't always better. The expenses associated with opening, operating, and integrating additional DCs can easily negate the cost savings and logistical advantages they provide. To figure out if the numbers will work in your favor, you should consider the following variables.
    

Number of SKUs vs. Order Volume

In general, the more SKUs you have, the more it will cost to coordinate with your suppliers to maintain inventory levels across multiple DCs. However, those costs can be offset if your order volume is high enough. As we previously mentioned, a new DC can reduce shipping costs (assuming it's closer to your customers, of course). The greater your order volume, the greater your savings on shipping. When determining the cost-effectiveness of acquiring a new DC, you'll want those shipping savings to exceed the added inventory and warehousing expenses.

Average Shipping Weight

The average dim weight of your orders should also be included in your cost/benefit analysis. Heavy orders will generate bigger cost savings when shipping from multiple DCs. Conversely, you may see minimal or no cost savings on lightweight orders.

Technology Scaling

Multiple systems may need to interface in order to properly count and route orders to the right distribution center. Can your order management system incorporate a new distribution center?

Improving your distribution network's size and efficiency by opening new centers can be a solid strategy for maintaining a competitive edge - but only if the pros, cons, and costs have been thoroughly vetted. Alternatively, a third-party fulfillment provider may be a better solution. You can reduce transit times, cut shipping costs, and increase order volume without taking on the risk of opening and operating a whole other distribution center. At Fulfillment Works, we utilize customized solutions to provide clients with full-service fulfillment including logistics management, data solutions, warehouse services (with facilities strategically located in Nevada and Connecticut), and much more. Contact us to learn how we can help with your distribution goals.

Tips for Improving Packaging Efficiency & Sustainability

Ecommerce businesses stand to benefit from implementing environmentally friendly business practices – and changing your approach to packaging is a great way to start. It can save you money, improve logistical efficiency, and drive home your brand's commitment to the environment with every single delivery. Follow these tips to start your transition into more sustainable packaging.
    

Choose environmentally-friendly packaging materials

Evaluate your current packaging for materials that can harm the environment - especially those that can't be recycled, take a long time to breakdown (like polystyrene foam and plastics), or that release toxins as they breakdown (like certain inks and adhesives). Can you switch these out for recyclable, eco-friendly equivalents? For example, corrugated cardboard tubes and scraps work well as dunnage and are easy to recycle. Similarly, laser printing, thermal printing, and soy-based inks are excellent alternatives to toxic inks and dyes.

Pack more efficiently

In addition to materials, your packing practices are also important. Larger-than-required packages waste filler materials and take up excess space in shipping vehicles, contributing to fuel consumption. Automated box making machines or custom-designed packaging are both eco-friendly solutions that not only save the earth, they save you money by conserving materials and reducing product damage during shipping.

Evaluate your logistics

Take a close look at how packages move from warehouse to doorstep for opportunities to reduce waste. Depending on your products and customers, there may be more you can do to combine individual orders into bulk shipments. If you notice lots of unused space in the trucks leaving your warehouse, consider co-shipping with other companies to reduce fuel costs.