Social Engineering Prevention Guidelines for CSRs

Information security is an ever-evolving issue for ecommerce sites. Even though technology has done a lot to stop them, fraud tactics are always changing in response to those countermeasures. In some cases, there's just not much technology can do. Take social engineering – when a fraudster posing as their target manipulates customer service representatives into granting access to the target's account or private information – for instance.

Also known as voice-phishing, or “vishing,” the practice is less common than email-based phishing but every bit as dangerous to ecommerce. According to the education and awareness website, social-engineer.org, the average cost of a successful vishing attack against a business is $43,000 per account compromised.

Most companies require customer service representatives to follow a multi-step process for authenticating callers before proceeding with service on an account. However, CSRs are also trained to keep customers happy. Whether it's because caller sounds irate or threatening, or the caller sounds authentic because they passed some parts of the authentication process (usually with information trawled from other areas of the internet), CSRs may share information that risks security with the intent of providing a good customer experience.

Unfortunately, calls to a live person don’t undergo the same digital fraud checks that online transactions do. To prevent scenarios where a CSR feels bullied or lulled into complying with an insecure request, companies need 1) a comprehensive flowchart of authentication steps with clear explanations of what to do when the caller can’t provide the required information 2) strict requirements for following protocols, and 3) assurance that managers trained for those scenarios will provide necessary support.

By training customer service teams to recognize social engineering and giving them the resources to stop fraudsters from stealing account data, ecommerce companies can protect their customers while still providing great service.

How to Prep your Site for a Flash Sale

According to research from the National Retail Federation, 73% of consumers ranked “sales and price discounts” as top factors for deciding where to shop. In the heyday of brick-and-mortar retail, it was common for stores to attract these prudent shoppers with highly-publicized mega-sales (typically held on a “Sunday, SUNDAY, SUNDAYYY!”). With the instantaneous nature of internet shopping, today’s ecommerce equivalent would probably be “flash sales.”
    
Like their predecessors, flash sales are great for attracting consumers’ attention, driving brand awareness, and boosting sales. However, the surges in traffic to your site and order volume can strain your internal resources and hamper customers’ experience. To ensure a successful flash sale that satisfies your customers, use the following tips to prepare.

Get the word out

Besides good deals, flash sales are known for their hype! Take the time to analyze your target audiences and develop a marketing strategy to stoke those fires so your flash sale is truly effective at engaging consumers and driving business.

Variety

A good flash sale quickly cycles through lots of different discounts, which engages shoppers who stick around to see what deals come next. Your assortment should be large enough to entice the widest variety of customers.

Site Search

Flash sales foster a sense of competition to seek and find deals faster than other consumers. If your site search bar is ineffective at finding products, you stand to lose the many mobile users who are accessing your flash sale throughout the day. Make sure your ecommerce site's search functionality has mobile-friendly features, such as autocomplete and search refinements (e.g. brand, color, size, price, etc.) with tap-friendly dropdown lists.
    

Ease of Transaction

The checkout process should just as speedy as your flash sale. Make sure to eliminate as much checkout friction as possible. The longer it takes to checkout, the more likely that shoppers' excitement from scoring a deal will wear off and they'll abandon their carts.

Customer Retention vs Acquisition

Growing your ecommerce business requires putting resources into both customer acquisition and customer retention. However, it's all too common to see companies that put too many of their eggs in the "acquisition" basket. According to consultants at Invesp, 44% of companies have a greater focus on customer acquisition vs. 18% that focus on retention. Unfortunately, that spread belies the great benefits that retention efforts can provide. Consider the following:

Without a doubt, acquisition is important for the short-term growth of your business and for increasing the number of customers to eventually direct retention efforts toward. As the New Year approaches, now may be the perfect time to evaluate whether your company is striking the right balance.

5 Tips for Reducing Customer Service Call Duration

Your call center is a critical part of the overall customer experience you provide. If you opt to outsource your call center management, you need to consider the provider’s capabilities before partnering with them – and average call duration is one of the most important metrics to consider. Generally, shorter is better. Reducing the amount of time your customers stay on the phone for customer service inquiries is a win-win. Your call center will be able to handle higher volumes, while customers save time and have a better experience. For optimal call duration, your call center or call center provider should do the following:

  1. Expand the decision-making authority of agents. Putting customers on hold to track down a supervisor to make a simple decision eats up time. Since most of these decisions involve free products or discounts, one solution is to give agents a small budget of "make-good" cash to apply toward these scenarios.
  2. Create a robust and up-to-date knowledge base on your ecommerce site that both customers and call center agents can easily access.
  3. Train agents thoroughly. Before agents start answering customer calls, they should receive a detailed overview of your company’s systems, policies, and products to enable them to quickly handle a wide variety of customer inquiries.
  4. When evaluating call quality metrics, make sure that the ability to manage hold time during calls is accounted for.
  5. Foster cooperation between departments. Sometimes, customer service agents don't have all the answers and need to put customers on hold while they reach out to the appropriate department. Take steps to ensure that agents have available and reliable contacts where necessary.

How to Leverage Customer Feedback for Strategic Improvements

Customer feedback is vital in any business or industry – after all, the customer is always right. Acting on the feedback you collect through reviews, emails, social media, and surveys not only helps you adapt to shoppers' preferences; it also shows that you value their input. Below are some of the major areas where you can use customer feedback to make improvements.

Products

Customer feedback can help shape your decision-making around merchandise strategy. While the exact approach will depend on your inventory and audience, it’s best to start broad. Start by examining overall customer sentiment according to product category to establish a baseline for expectations. As you narrow the focus of your customer feedback analysis, it’ll be easier to establish whether individual products or a whole category is underperforming. From there, you can discover if there are new SKUs you should be adding to your inventory, or if you should discontinue item/categories that aren’t meeting shoppers’ expectations.

Site usability & design

The UX of your ecommerce site can be one of the most important keys to its success – and customer feedback in this area can help you identify pain points and bottlenecks that you can address to improve usability and eliminate customer frustrations.

Customer experience

If your customer service department uses call monitoring tools, that’s an excellent resource for finding areas of the customer experience that need improvement. Reviewing customer service calls can reveal patterns or errors you may not find by manually browsing your site, such as pricing errors, frequently asked questions, or even areas where customer service reps need more training. You can also assess your customer experience by analyzing product return codes to look for common themes (this can also be useful for shaping your merchandise strategy).