5 Packaging Insert Ideas for Ecommerce

You have order fulfillment down to a science and have hired a 3PL to handle storing, picking, packing and shipping your products. But your customer’s journey doesn’t end with order fulfillment. If you’re looking for a way to maximize your buyers’ unboxing experiences while driving customer loyalty and sales, we have a suggestion: packaging inserts.

THE BENEFITS OF PACKAGING INSERTS

Unboxing doesn’t have to be the end of the road in your customers’ purchase process. Think of it as the start of a different journey. In fact, selling to an existing customer is a lot easier than selling to a new one.

Let’s look at some customer retention statistics:

  • The success rate of selling to an existing customer is 60-70 percent. The success rate of selling to a new customer is 5-20 percent.
  • Increasing customer retention by 5 percent can increase your profits from 25-95 percent.
  • About 80 percent of your future profits will come from just 20 percent of your existing customers.

The reason it’s easier to convert existing customers is simple: they have already purchased from you, which makes them easier to retarget in your remarketing efforts. A well-targeted packaging insert will not only make customers feel special, it will increase brand loyalty too. There are many ways you can incorporate them into your customers’ unpackaging experiences.

PACKAGING INSERT IDEAS

Thank you notes: Add personalized thank-you notes that will make an impression with your customers. Don't say “Thank you for your order” which can make your customers feel like statistics. Show your customers you value their support rather than their business. Opt for "Thanks for choosing us" instead.

Promo codes: Give your existing customers a reason to make another purchase by including a promo code with an exclusive discount as an incentive. Don't forget to track and measure your ROI. Create campaign-specific promo codes to measure how many people redeem the code and how much they spend on each transaction.

Offers: Offer free shipping on their next order. Everyone loves free shipping, especially if it’s exclusive to them. Not only will this offer incentivize your customers, it’s also an effective way to minimize buyer’s remorse. “I didn’t really need that, but I had free shipping, so…”

Feedback: Ask your customers to write a review of their purchase. Customers who write reviews tend to develop a loyalty to that business because it gives them a voice in the online purchasing process. The easiest way to get customers to review your product? Just ask.

Free samples: Product samples are technically packaging inserts, so consider adding a free gift along with purchases. Your customers will be delighted at the idea of getting something unexpected for free. It’s the principle of reciprocity in marketing. When you offer your customers something helpful for free, they will feel indebted to you.

Packaging inserts can improve your brand perception and boost your marketing reach. They are also a cost-effective way to drive customer loyalty and sales. Personalize them, and you’ll be on your way to maximizing your buyers’ unboxing experiences.

3 Best Practices to Better Your BOPIS Retail Strategy

Thanks to fierce competition in the retail world, consumers have more and more options when it comes to shopping. And whether it’s online, mobile or in-store, both ecommerce and brick-and-mortar retailers have diligently stepped up their games to keep up with new demands.

One option still gaining popularity is buy-online-pickup-in-store (BOPIS). According to a report by Adobe Analytics, BOPIS increased 50 percent over the 2018 holiday season. But effective BOPIS retail strategies have proved somewhat challenging for retailers. What makes click-and-collect so tricky to execute?

There are several components that can trip up a BOPIS strategy, including inventory inaccuracies, communication, and execution.

However, there are best practices you can use to better your BOPIS retail strategy and improve the consistency of your service offering.

TRACK YOUR INVENTORY (ACCURATELY)

Today’s fulfillment options mean many moving parts for omnichannel retailers. Things can get especially tricky when online customers shop for products specifically marked as available for BOPIS. Imagine, for example, two customers add the same item to their online cart, but your store only has one of those items in stock. Come checkout, one of those shoppers won’t be happy – you’ll likely lose a sale, and possibly a customer.

This is why as a retailer, you need to implement real-time cross-channel inventory tracking and order fulfillment to keep your inventory as up to date as possible.

Inventory that isn't carefully tracked and managed can create big problems down the road. Make sure to incorporate best practices into your day-to-day inventory management. It is crucial to the success of your BOPIS retail strategy.

SWEAT THE DETAILS

If not everything you sell online is available for BOPIS, be clear about it from the get-go.

Enable your online customers to set their store location and add a filter that gives them the ability to shop for products that are only available for in-store pickup. Be sure to promote your filter at the top of your product pages; you want shoppers to know if they can pick up their orders in-store before they begin shopping.

Once your customer places a BOPIS order, communication is key. Send an immediate confirmation and include order details, clear directions on where to pick up in-store, and what forms of identification are needed.

NAIL YOUR PICK-UP PROCESS

Are you placing your BOPIS pickup points at the back of your store to seduce customers into buying more stuff? Don’t. Instead, make it easy for your customers to retrieve their orders by placing your pickup location at the front of your store. Use clear signage or even consider curbside service to designated parking spaces. Remember, your customers don’t want to feel manipulated; they chose your BOPIS service because they want a quick and convenient online shopping experience.

Another important factor in the pick-up process is to make sure your staff has the information they need to make your customers' BOPIS experience a good one. They should be able to retrieve orders quickly and know how to handle potential problems such as returns. Or consider having dedicated staff specifically for your BOPIS orders. Either way, proper staff training will help ensure a successful BOPIS strategy.

Do you even need a BOPIS strategy? What if it’s just a fad?

According to a Signifyd survey, millennials' shopping preferences are what’s driving the need for BOPIS. And despite its implementation challenges, BOPIS is here to stay. If you’re a retailer wanting to make the most of this shopping experience, make sure you understand and follow BOPIS best practices.

Continue Creating a Great Customer Experience, Even After Checkout

The experience that shoppers have with your ecommerce brand isn't limited to interactions with your website. It continues offline through the product fulfillment process – including how an order is packaged, the condition of the items in an order, and efficiency of the returns process. While your direct control over shipping and handling is limited during the last mile, there are a few things you can do before packages leave your warehouse that will go a long way toward giving customers a delivery experience that makes a good impression.

Right-Sizing

In a Harris Poll survey (funded by packaging manufacturer, Sealed Air) of more than 2,000 U.S. adult consumers, 66% believed that an item’s packaging tells them something about how much the brand cares about them. From excessive or messy dunnage (like Styrofoam peanuts) to small products in oversized containers – when customers are left to do the dirty work of cleaning up all that wasteful material, their experience with your brand suffers. Customizing your packaging to an optimal size can not only help create a better brand image in the eyes of your customers, it can reduce shipping and materials costs over the long-term.

Damage protection

In the previously mentioned survey, 59% of consumers believed that retailers and carriers are equally responsible for damage to a product that was ordered online. By right-sizing your containers and using the latest in dunnage technology, you can better protect your shipments and spare your customers the disappointing experience of waiting for an order, only for it to arrive in less than mint condition. Additionally, since customers are more likely to place the blame on you if your products arrived damaged, strive to work more closely with your carriers and/or 3PL provider to find solutions for reducing damaged inventory.

Handling Returns

By mastering reverse logistics, you can minimize the cost of the returns processing and recoup lost profit from the returned product. But more importantly, customers love a smooth returns process, so your customer satisfaction can increase as well. Remember: Every return is another point of engagement with your customer. It should reflect the same focus and attention to detail as every other part of the customer experience. Once you assure a customer that your returns process is easy, then you eliminate hesitation from the next purchase and convince them to shop with you again and again.

Supply Chain Visibility – A Win-Win for Customers and E-Tailers

A good customer experience (CX) comes from consistently meeting shoppers' expectations during ALL touchpoints with your ecommerce business. Things like the UX design of your website, the tone and content of social media posts & marketing emails, your returns policy, customer service interactions, and the unboxing experience are just a few examples of customer experience factors that e-tailers tend to prioritize. However, despite improved understanding and measurement of how supply chains impact customers, little progress has been made in recent years towards using this information to make CX better.

In a joint study from logistics companies, Convey and eft, designed to assess the importance of customer experience in last mile delivery, 96% of survey respondents said CX is a critical measure of last-mile success. Despite this, just 5% of respondents said their current supply chain management systems fully support efforts to improve CX, while 61% said their systems do nothing to improve CX.

For e-tailers who want to improve their CX through last-mile fulfillment, increasing the level of transparency into your supply chain is a great starting point. For one, you can’t make improvements to your supply chain unless you understand all of the moving parts involved – so building up your visibility into the chain should be a natural extension of your work to uncover opportunities for improvement. Secondly, sharing supply chain visibility and inventory levels with your customers can improve their shopping experience.

The result is a win-win scenario. By enhancing fulfillment visibility, you can improve CX by providing inventory levels on product pages, back-in-stock alerts, accurate order tracking, and other features that help remove friction and uncertainty from the buyer’s journey. On the fulfillment side, better visibility into your supply chain and inventory levels can help you increase process efficiency to provide faster order delivery.

5 Live Chat Benefits for Your E-commerce Business

If you're still undecided about adding a live chat option to your e-commerce site, it's probably time you get off the fence. Why? Because consumers are a chatty bunch.

When it comes to communicating with companies, today’s consumers want a variety of options across multiple channels, according to a recent study from customer service firm Gladly. They also expect zero repeats and one answer.

That may seem like a tall order, but today, the quality of your company’s customer service is what sets you apart from the pack. In fact, Gladly found that 54% of consumers make decisions based on customer service, with 68% saying they’d pay more for products and services from a company with a strong customer service record.

To put the popularity of live chatting into perspective, it’s also important to understand who the largest consumer demographic in the world belongs to right now: millennials. This is the first generation to have grown up around computers and smartphones. They expect their shopping experiences to be seamless and technology-driven – and that includes customer service, where they demand quick responses to their queries, preferably via chat.

Adding live chat to your e-commerce site has a host of benefits. Here are our Top 5:

1. It's Fast

A live chat immediately connects your customer with a representative. Traditional call center directories, meanwhile, can be difficult to navigate and can quickly aggravate customers, especially if they’re placed in a lengthy queue.

2. It's Easy

In a live chat, information is easier to relay. For example, confirmation numbers can be cut and pasted, and product links can be shared and clicked. Instructions tend to be easier to understand and the chat moves along at your customer’s pace.

3. It's Practical

We know consumers want a variety of customer service options available across multiple channels. Live chats can be initiated on a PC, laptop, tablet or smartphone at any time.

4. It's Convenient

Live chats don’t involve call transfers and your customers will never be asked to repeat information. In most cases, problems are resolved quickly and more efficiently, increasing customer satisfaction.

5. It's Effective

Live chat software can sync with other related systems and services, so information about previous orders and chats can be easily accessed and aggregated. That helps you provide a better customer experience across the board.

While live chat is a great way to appease modern consumers who prefer texting and messaging, it can be equally beneficial to your e-commerce business. With live chat, you’ll gain a better grasp of your customers’ pain points, which can help improve customer satisfaction and increase sales. Remember, your e-commerce company’s approach to customer service is critical for lasting success.